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Resources and Activities for Digital Learning Day

We are one week from Digital Learning Day! - 02.06.13 
(Yes PHS Pirates, we are a participating school!)


"Digital learning is any instructional practice that effectively uses technology to strengthen a student's learning experience. Much more than "online learning," digital learning encompasses a wide spectrum of tools and practice, digital learning emphasizes high-quality instruction and provides access to challenging content, feedback through formative assessment, opportunities for learning anytime and anywhere, and individualized instruction to ensure all students reach their full potential to succeed in college and a career."


What are the characteristics of Digital Learning?
  • Personalized & flexible
  • Led by supported teachers & students
  • Collaborative & aligned to a collective vision
  • Flexible, high quality resources
  • Data-driven, transparent, and ongoing
  • Authentic learning & authentic audiences

What is Digital Learning Day?

"Digital Learning Day is a national campaign that celebrates teachers and shines a spotlight on successful instructional practice and effective use of technology in classrooms across the country.  Last year's inaugural DLD boasted tens of thousands of teachers representing nearly two million students."

How can we celebrate innovative teaching & connected learning?


Digital Learning Lesson Plans

  1. Student Book Review - Blog Style  (Amy Blaine, Julie Esanu, Greg Chapuis)
  2. Visual Book Report - (Mary Beth Bauernschub)
  3. SAT Comic Strips - ( Kristen Nielsen,  Deborah Lambert)
  4. Writing Powerful Blog Comments (Janet Ilko)
  5. Newseum's Digital Classroom - Video lessons and primary sources

Additional Digital Learning Resources (Sara Hall - @DLDay2013)

Intel Teach Elements - Professional Development Courses

DLD Student Reports






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