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Post 50; Why am I Blogging?

"Y" is my favorite letter. Why? Because as a question, it opens doors to greater understanding, more information, and self-reflection. For instance, "Y am I blogging"? This post represents a milestone - my 50th blog post on "Nocking the Arrow". Looking back over the past year, I've written a few posts that I am very proud of, and there are others that I now view as rather pitiful. It is hard to gauge which posts will generate the most interest. My favorites don't necessarily generate a lot of traffic. It seems like many readers gravitate towards posts that provide some bit of practical direction or advice.

CC FlickRiver


Writing is not especially easy or natural for me. It usually takes me several hours to compose a piece that I consider to be "blog worthy". I cross check my resources to make sure that my information is accurate. I proof read my work several times to catch as many grammatical errors as I can - and I still regularly miss a few. I try to mention those people or sources that inspired the post. I try to make the posts visually appealing and organized for interest and easy reading.




Some of my posts have become information archives, while others are treated as living documents since newer, and sometimes better, information flows through my RSS reader. Blogging, at times, can be an uncomfortable challenge for me. My posts have improved as I have recorded observations of why my favorite bloggers are interesting and popular. I view blogging as an essential part of my connected learning activities.






Back to my original question, "Y" am I blogging?
  • I blog to release some of the thoughts and ideas that accumulate during the week. (My goal is to publish at least one post per week.) Yes, I blog so that I can sleep at night.
  • I blog so that I don't have to fill my colleagues' email in boxes with instructional Technology Tips. Email, to many of us, is fast becoming a limited, outdated, form of communication. Frankly, who has the time?
  • I blog to increase my understanding of what I have read, discussed, or experienced.
  • I blog to share what I learn. This is at the very heart of being a connected educator. As one of my PLN members wrote recently, "If I was a doctor who discovered a cure for cancer, and I kept this information to myself, what good have I really done?"
  • I blog to help myself and others learn. Research and fact-finding is an interesting and satisfying learning activity, particularly when I choose the topic of study. (Inquiry-based Learning)
  • I blog to reflect on my growth as a parent, an educator, and generally, as a person trying to make a positive impact.
  • I blog to help create digital relationships, and support those people that make up my personal learning network. Sometimes isolation creeps into our working condition. Blogging helps break from that feeling.
  • I blog to become a more polished writer. My bucket list contains the hope of one day becoming a published author.
  • I blog to model connected learning etiquette to teachers and students.
  • I blog because it feels good knowing that someone else appreciates my perspective.  Notice, that I didn't use the word, agrees. It is energizing and empowering to know that your thoughts and words matter.
  • I blog because a good friend, +Keith Sorensen, suggested that it would be good professional practice to do so. Blogging has certainly extended the reaches, and depth, of my PLN.
Why do you blog? What have you learned from blogging?  
Your comments are welcome and appreciated.

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