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Lifelong Learning; More Than Lip Service

Today was my birthday. After nearly 1/2 century, the celebration is a bit muted tonight. Not just because 49 is an insignificant, prime number, but because my birthday typically falls during the first week of school, which as you know, can be a rather wild whirlwind, two parts excitement mixed with one part stress. That said, today does offer me a chance to reflect on a conversation that I shared with my principal during our weekly meeting. We shared our beliefs about lifelong, passion-based learning, and it was an enthusiastic discussion that inspired this post.
I am thinking back to two weeks ago when I realized how few of my district leadership team members were connected to a personal learning network. Many of these folks are within a few years of retirement, and the likelihood, and hope, is that most of these folks will live for decades beyond retirement.

The question that is puzzling me tonight is... 
If our most experienced educators aren't currently establishing relevancy through PLN connections, how can they expect to achieve this in their later years?

This same collection of leaders all agree that lifelong learning is a foundation of our district mission, and profession. 

I see no better way to stay engaged as a lifelong learner than through connecting and sharing knowledge, experience, and expertise with a personal learning network (PLN).


Many of the folks that I describe are respected mentors that have provided guidance, direction, and opportunities to many of my colleagues and me. I am now asking them to stay viable, relevant, and connected by sharing to a larger classroom. I guess I am also saying that I will miss many of them when they're gone.

Lifelong learning should be more than lip service.

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