Skip to main content

21st Century School Supply List


I recently received a parent newsletter containing the suggested school supply lists for the coming school year. These lists looks strangely similar, dare I say, almost identical (sans graphing calculator) to the ones I remember as a kid - nearly four decades ago. But how can this be? With all of the disruption and pedagogical shifting going on, shouldn't the requisite school supplies be different that they were even five years ago?

I have fond memories of the 8-count jumbo Crayola crayons.  Do you remember their waxy smell? But of course, 8 wasn't enough. After a few steps up the color ladder, I had the 64-count box with the onboard crayon sharpener. How about Elmer's paste? That also had an interesting odor. I enjoyed getting ten packs of new Ticonderoga #2 pencils draped in the familiar yellow with pink (chewy) erasers. My brother and I were careful to pick out folder / binder designs that were fun, but didn't make us look silly or uncool. Sports themes, Star Wars, and Pink Panther were safe, while Snoopy, Ninja Turtles, and The Smurphs left you vulnerable to attacks on your maturity level.



Yes, I will refocus...shouldn't the school supply list for 2013-2014 look at least a little different than it did in 1973-1974? Here's a comparison of school supply lists - old school (2013-2014) and um, new school (also 2013-2014).

How does your "new school" supply list differ from mine?





After several comments about expense for our F&RL students, what if the school district provided the iPads?  Is it reasonable to expect students to take responsibility for the remaining items?



photo credit: srqpix via photopin cc

Comments

Susan WB said…
What strikes me about these lists is that the "old school" list was supplied by the student/family, while the "new school" list is typically the kind of thing supplied by the school. We don't require parents to provide tech for children, and in fact my schools have very strong policies AGAINST bring-your-own-device. Do you think that will change in the near term?
Robert Schuetz said…
Thank you Susan. Our district currently provides the iPads, cases, and apps for 50% of our students. My focus wasn't really on who's responsibility it is - I think it should be shared. My main point was to point out an obsolete list of supplies that supports obsolete, single-use, learning practices. I would hope that district administrations would be receptive to BYOD, particularly if financial limitations provide no other option.
Jarod Bormann said…
We are 1:1 with iPads, and I think earbuds is a must. I would also be nice to have a list of sites/apps that you would like the students to create accounts for ahead of time. Most of these the students use their school issued Google account and password. I think I may add these to my school list for next year.
Thanks.

Popular posts from this blog

Learning that Matters

Originally posted on Fractus Learning - 5.3.16

“Today we speak casually of lifelong learning, but in a few decades, it will likely be so much the norm as hardly to require its own label.” - David Perkins

You’re an educator with your finger on the pulse of what’s relevant to teaching and school. Being well read, you know that educational thought leaders are focusing recent dialogue on learning. Schools have always been places of learning, but few can deny the impact the Internet has on a person’s ability to learn whatever they want, whenever they want. Let’s have some fun by responding with the first word that pops into your mind.

Fill in the blank to complete the following phrase;______________________ learning.

The possible answers are numerous, aren’t they? Is your response included in the table below?


Authentic Problem-based Project-based Individualized Personalized Cooperative Flipped Mastery Community-based

To Email, or Not

Should current students learn how to use email?


As someone who celebrates a clean email inbox about once every five years, I found it interesting that the topic of student email usage was on the agenda of our recent high school leadership meeting. The focus of this brief conversation concentrated on these questions.



How can we get students to utilize their school email account better? Should we be teaching students how to communicate with email?When and where should email usage skills be taught? Who's responsibility is this?Why do we want kids to check their email? Those around the conference room table agreed with the importance of students checking their email to stay informed about upcoming events and opportunities. Others mentioned it as being an important part of "digital executive functioning." Time was running short when someone said, "Kids don't use email."

This brief statement sent my mind scurrying in several simultaneous directions. 

First, thinking …

Practice Makes Learning

“Practice isn't the thing you do once you're good. It's the thing you do that makes you good.”― Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
Yesterday, I sent a tweet to my friend Aaron Davis to congratulate him on his excellent blog, Read Write Respond, being recognized as a finalist for an Edublog Award (#Eddies15). He graciously responded with this...
@robert_schuetz@debsnet congrats to you too Bob. You got a gig as well — Aaron Davis (@mrkrndvs) December 11, 2015My first thought was, "whaaaa?". My second thought was, Aaron's in Melbourne and I'm near Chicago, must be something lost in translation. After checking out the Edublog site, sure enough, my blog is listed as a finalist in the Teacher Blog category. Honor and pride began percolating for two reasons. 
First, my blog was listed along with others that I read, and comment on, nearly every day. Blogs from people I hold in high regard as friends, as thought-change leaders in education, and as peopl…