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Nocking the Arrow - 2013

Pelican Lake, MN
2013 was an inspired year of personal and connected learning for me. It was my intention to share my thoughts and "learnings" within the seventy-two posts published during the past year. The bloggers that I read regularly, such as George Couros, Tom Whitby, or Will Richardson are those that challenge my thinking while igniting some degree of action, or reaction. Thought change leaders such as these start with, and make me ask "why?".  I want my writing to evolve away from apps, devices, and tools, and move more towards pedagogy, mindset, and social learning. 

That said, and I am not quite sure why, but it's still my more "how to", and "what is" posts that attract the most attention. Here are my three most popular posts for 2013 based upon reader page views.

  1. 1:1 Digital Workflow (2721 page views) - provides a recipe for document workflow in a 1:1 iPad classroom.
  2. Classroom Management in a 1:1 Environment (2522 page views) - provides strategies and resources for managing student behavior in a 1:1 supported classroom.
  3. 3 Significant Obstacles to Creating a PLN (1081 page views) - this post was also published to Schoology's Blog. It summarizes a discussion with educators looking to overcome obstacles and get started with connecting to a personal learning network.
I subscribe to close to 100 blogs that I read daily. Additionally, Flipboard and Zite have become my current event gateways. My personal learning network has grown from a few, to a few thousand influential educators looking to improve school, and create a culture of learning. I know how much I value the comments that are submitted to my posts, and I make a point to comment on at least one post each day. In addition to this blog, Twitter has become a pillar of my PLN interaction. Twitter has changed the way that I view learning, and it energizes my educational spirit every day. You can read my tweets, see my lists, and follow me @robert_schuetz.

Although I read and follow hundreds, maybe thousands, of people with interests in promoting learning and improving education, here are several bloggers that have had the greatest impact on my thinking and writing this year. If you haven't done so already, I encourage you to check out their work.

  1. Tom Whitby - My Island View
  2. Silvia Tolisano - Langwitches Blog
  3. Dr. Jackie Gerstein - Jackie Gerstein
  4. George Couros - The Principal of Change
  5. Steve Wheeler - Learning With "e"s
  6. Justin Tarte - Life of an Educator
  7. Eric Sheninger - A Principal's Reflections

"Nocking the Arrow" is a labor of love for me. It is quickly evolving into my digital portfolio of learning. The title, which is correctly spelled, is an archery term referring to setting the arrow on the bowstring prior to taking aim at the target. I equate this to having a vision and plan in one's mind prior to taking sensory and motor action. I appreciate the opportunity to share my thoughts, and I appreciate those folks that have taken the time to read my posts. I intend to be more tenacious and thought-provoking in 2014. My primary focus will be encouraging every learner to build a positive digital footprint with a digital (web) portfolio as evidence of mastery and learning. I am looking forward to learning and growing with all of you this coming year!

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