Skip to main content

Challenge 2015; Contribute To The Worldwide Classroom

Reinforcing suggestions from favored PLN (personal learning network) contributors, A.J. Juliani, Silvia Tolisano, and Jackie Gerstein, one challenge for the coming year becomes clear; learners regardless of age or status, should find ways to contribute to the worldwide classroom. The Internet, and the unlimited accessibility to information means that our traditional concept of classroom must change. Modern learning spaces are built upon networks sharing knowledge and experiences. Thriving in these new learning spaces means being able to connect, curate, communicate, create, and contribute. The value of a learning network depends upon contributions from its members. Today, educational thought leaders are those people making consistent and impacting contributions to their learning networks. "It is more blessed to give than to receive."



Now, more than any other time in the past 100 years, education seems on the verge of a paradigm shift. You see, for the past century, most of the educational change has been “doing old things in new ways”. Today, we are beginning to see educators, educational institutions, and educational companies do “new things in new ways”. - A.J. Juliani


Networking is built on a concept of sharing. Networking is defined by the Merriam_Webster dictionary as “the exchange of information or services among individuals, groups, or institutions”. In order for an exchange to take place, someone has to step up to SHARE. Without sharing there is no network. - Silvia Tolisano

The Internet of today has become a huge picture window and portal into human perceptions, thinking, and behavior. Logically, then, we would expect that schools would follow suit in matching what is happening via the Internet to assist children and youth to function, learn, work, and play in a healthy, interactive, and pro-social manner in their societies-at-large. - Dr. Jackie Gerstein

What did you learn from others?  What did you contribute to the learning of others? 
Dean Shareski


Three ways learners can contribute in the worldwide classroom


  1. Connect and Share - Social media are popular "virtual" meeting places for educators, with the most popular being Twitter, Facebook, Google+, and Linkedin. The Educator's PLN and Classroom 2.0 are supportive online communities for educators. Knowing the power of the hashtag, and knowing when Twitter chats occur jump starts one's ability to connect and share.
  2. Curate and Share - The Internet provides access to unlimited access to information easily and inexpensively. The ability to effectively search and sift information is essential in a Web 3.0 world. Equally important is the ability to analyze and compare digital resources for their learning value. RSS readers and tools like IFTTT, help increase search efficiency by delivering subscribed material to the learner. Many apps have a "share to" box for distributing valued resources to the learning network. I use Twitter, Pinterest, and Flipboard for the bulk of my saving and sharing.
  3. Create and Share - Following processing and reflection, a new learning resource can be created. Blogs, presentation slides, podcasts. and videos are examples of artifacts that perpetuate and expand learning in the worldwide classroom. These artifacts can be used as evidence in a digital learning portfolio. Transparently sharing learning to authentic audiences raises performance expectations and creates opportunities for feedback, discussion, and the sharing of varied perspectives.


According to Dictionary.com, "a classroom is any place where one learns or gains experience". The traditional concept of classroom needs updating to fit the socially networked world in which we live. More than merely raising a hand, contributing to learning in modern learning spaces means connecting to others, effective curation of information, and creating new resources supportive of a worldwide culture of learning.

Related Reading



3 Reasons Why You Should Share... - Silvia Tolisano

Build A School In The Cloud - TedTalk, Sugata Mitra



photo credit: robotpolisher via photopin cc

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

"Five Reasons Why Schoology Rocks!"

Networking at IETC last week provided me validation in my choice for best learning management system, Schoology . Having used Moodle, Edmodo, Canvas, and Blackboard, I can tell you that these are all terrific products for digital instruction. However, for the past several months, I felt that Schoology was a better choice than these previously mentioned products. Many times, asking the right questions is a precursor to making sound decisions. Here's an article that serves as a guide to asking the right questions when choosing a learning management system: 10 Questions Everyone Should Ask When Choosing an LMS Here are five reasons why Schoology remains my #1 choice for a classroom LMS: Full-featured classroom organization tools, a collaborative learning place for teachers and students, device-independent applications, Schoology API  allows the program to play nicely with others, and the basic level instructional components are, and will always be, FREE. 1.  School

My One Word for 2018 is Wisdom

Wisdom, according to Dictionary.com , is "the quality or state of being wise; knowledge of what is true or right coupled with just judgment as to action; sagacity, discernment, or insight." "Any fool can know. The point is to understand." This quote, often incorrectly attributed to Albert Einstein , provides an illustration of the value of understanding over knowledge. A simple search reveals this quote can be linked to the writing of mathematician, George Finlay Simmons .  Narrowing my thinking to one word is an interesting challenge. I have gained a greater appreciation for words and how the combination of words can convey meaning beyond definitions, beyond knowledge. Where are the resources for knowledge in a modern world? We purchased an Amazon Echo as a gift for my parents. "It's such a smart and funny device," says my mom. Alexa has a seemingly unlimited access to information, music, and jokes, but does she understand? Can

Grammarly Writing Hacks for Better Blogging

Writing is learning. It's taken me about thirty years to realize the metacognitive power of written expression, the same amount of time it took for me to recognize that my writing skills suck. Apparently, time in composition class was spent daydreaming and making silly faces at girls. Today, each post is an exercise of will power, unlearning and relearning prepositional phrases, comma usage, and when to use the ever-popular semicolon. Two hundred posts into my blogging adventure I've picked up a few tricks that add efficiency to my writing, things that make me appear smarter than I really am. Freelance writer, Jennie Cromie , writing for ProBlogger.net , identifies five ways blogging can make you a better writer . Discover your voice Build social connections Acquire valuable feedback Become self-disciplined Write faster and more efficiently Writing with intent to learn is the mindset to lead with. Using the right tools permits scatterbrains like me to focu