Skip to main content

Update or Archive; Learning From Our Older Blog Posts

Subscribers and followers will notice a clean, new look to Nocking the Arrow. No longer do I have to be a "Blogger Apologist" to the many WordPress enthusiasts out there, as a menu of new themes recently arrived at my doorstep. In the same vein as Sites, Google has added options to create a clean, contemporary look with your blog. Google announced their new Blogger themes in March 2017. Along with the improved look and navigation, they promise better fit and functionality on mobile devices. This update has corrected the frequent crashing of the Blogger mobile app on iOS devices. 


The recent arrival of these themes to my Blogger dashboard coincided with Aaron Davis's Twitter inquiry about blogging platforms and spam blocking. It took a few years for me to get the look and function of "Nocking..." just right. It took me less than an hour to wipe out these customizations in favor of a voguish theme closely resembling beautiful views offered by blogging platforms such as Medium, Weebly, and WordPress. I selected the Notable theme in basic white, adjusted the accent colors and fonts to taste, and then reviewed my changes in a live view. If it could be any easier, I'm not sure how.



The new themes can be accessed by clicking the "Theme" link along the left side of the Blogger dashboard. Blogger themes can be customized by changing color and font settings. 

More advanced customization can be achieved by altering or introducing new lines, of HTML code. Be prepared to either relocate or remove previously installed gadgets as some of these will not fit your newly updated theme. I removed several gadgets to reduce clutter and achieve the minimalist appearance I have grown to appreciate through daily jaunts into my blog reader. Removing gadgets created more screen space for text and graphics. If you want to see my Twitter feed, follow me on Twitter.


Should older blog posts be archived or updated? 


This is a question I've grappled with for some time, more so now that I have refreshed the appearance of this blog. Reviewing archived posts allows opportunities for reflection, assess changes in thinking, and appreciate personal growth. Revising posts helps keep the material current and accurate. Broken links, grammatical errors, and outdated design can be corrected with a quick update to an archived post. I frequently update my earlier blog posts to make corrections, adjust spacing, and add resources to the piece.

What about you? Do you think of your blog posts as an archived journal, or do you treat them as living documents open to revision? Either way, there is knowledge to be gained by sharing our learning and periodically reviewing what we have shared.


Related Reading



"Share Your Unique Style with New Blogger Themes.Official Blogger Blog. 20 Mar. 2017.

"The Grind and the Streak." Edutopia. 07 July 2017.

Comments

Joy Kirr said…
Hi, Bob! I was just thinking that same question! What I've been doing is editing if I find links that don't work anymore, and I also add new information at the bottom of some posts, so those are my "live" blog posts. I still keep my old thoughts up, so I can see how I've changed my thinking over the past four years. I like the history. I like seeing the small shifts I've made, and sometimes it brings some nostalgia. Nice new look for you here!
Aaron Davis said…
I cannot believe that the changes have been there for three months and I hadn't realised. I like your point about the Twitter widget. My question in regards to archiving is what you do when you build on past posts. For example, I completed two 'badges' as a part of a course on ... Badging. The thing is that I have incorporated what matters from both of those posts in a longer more thorough post on Open Badges. Do I remove the shorter posts? Provide a link at the end to the longer post? I am not sure. In regards to broken links, WP.org has a plugin that detects broken links meaning that you can work through the dead ones if it is a concern.

Popular posts from this blog

Tech Time Saver #3 - URL Shorteners

Richard Byrne reminded me earlier this week that URL ( uniform resource locator ) shorteners are very simple ways to make web navigation more effective and time efficient for you and your students. Here is a comparison of three popular URL shorteners;  Google URL Shortener ,  Bitly URL Shortener , and  TinyURL.com . Google URL Shortener - is my personal favorite. Simply copy the original, lengthy URL and paste it into the space provided at goo.gl . Google then creates the short URL that can be copied and pasted as a link into blogs, tweets, or presentations. Google URL Shortener becomes even better when the Chrome browser is partnered with the Google URL Shortener Extension . One click condenses the URL from dozens, to possibly hundreds, of characters down to a randomized assortment of five letters and numbers. In addition, this click provides an option of creating a QR code from the URL. Usage statistics for the shortened URL can be tracked through Google Analytics.

Self-Directed vs. Self-Determined Learning; What's the Difference?

"We need to move beyond the idea that an education is something that is provided for us, and toward the idea that an education is something that we create for ourselves." - Stephen Downes In this age of abundance of information, shifting classroom pedagogy isn't nearly enough to make learning in school more relevant and authentic for the learner. Self-directed learning ( andragogy ), and self-determined learning ( heutagogy ) are the ideals necessary in making students " future ready " to live and learn in a web-connected world. While original research applied these concepts to mature learners, it has become apparent that even young children have an abundant capacity for recognizing and directing their learning. Anyone who has observed toddlers learning how to walk and talk understand the motivation and skill development that quickly develops during these processes. Considered by some to be on a learning continuum, self-directed learning, and self-determined

Digital Badges for Teacher Professional Development

Increasingly, digital badges are becoming a topic of discussion for educators. A digital badge is a digitized token of recognition for acquiring a skill, demonstrating a competency, or for sharing knowledge gained from the completion of an activity or project. As more of our learning comes by way of digital connections and contributions, badges are becoming a more prominent method of acknowledging skills and accomplishments. Many teachers readily acknowledge the importance of personalization of learning for students. Shouldn't professional development experiences offer the same promise? Ask a typical teacher to describe their PD experiences in a single word and you will likely get responses such as irrelevant or  boring . Besides personalization and relevance, digital badges provide opportunities for teachers to discuss the skills and knowledge that support educational best practice, and professional growth. These conversations support the form and function of profession